< Back to Blog

January 2019

,

Luma Bendini

An introduction to wind climate assessment in an urban area

The quantification of the complex wind dynamics around high-rise buildings can answer questions concerning life quality, security and the development of the surrounding area.

Wind tunnel, pedestrian comfort and digital simulations

Never before have architects and engineers had a chance to be so creative when designing a new building. Economical and technical advances have allowed them to build unimaginable shapes and forms. Designing buildings is a complex business, influenced by many different aspects. And we are here to say: aerodynamics must be one of them!

That’s because shape, size, orientation and the vicinity of a building can alternate wind flow in a favourable or unfavourable manner for pedestrians. Increased wind speed can create a dangerous environment for the elderly or infants, but reduced wind speeds can also lead to an insufficient exchange of air.

That’s where the wind study comes in. The quantification of the complex wind dynamics around high-rise buildings can answer questions concerning life quality, security and the development of the surrounding area.

So understanding and optimising the design according to aerodynamic concepts is the key to creating a safe and comfortable urban environment. When was the last time you’ve listened to what the wind has to say about your design?

Traditionally, in building engineering, physical wind tunnel experiments have been used to measure wind speed. But thanks to technology and advances in computational power, digital simulation has emerged as an important tool for enhancing our understanding of fluid motion, and offers the potential to serve as decision support in urban planning.

Wind simulations can provide detailed information on fluid flow- which is difficult to measure by experiments, and it offers the possibility for large-scale studies and sensitivity analysis.

 When was the last time you’ve listened to what the wind has to say about your design? 

Are digital simulations replacing physical facilities? 

At Ingrid Cloud, we believe digital simulations are expanding the usage of numerical simulations- making it more accessible and efficient. Physical facilities are important for some projects, and especially during validation phases. However, digital simulations are faster and can be used in a wider range of cases.

That said, let’s take a look at a real-world example of how a wind climate assessment can guide architects and engineers starting at the very early design phase...

Wind climate assessment in an urban area: a case study in Stockholm, Sweden.

Click here to read and visualise this case study.

Wind climate assessment on urban area: a case study